Absolutely Unreal!

It's been nearly three weeks since I last updated with anything on this dev blog and it's quite about time that I lay down some law.

The main reason, perhaps the only reason, that we haven't updated is because we decided to change our development engine.  Originally we were using Unity 3D.  But it was revealed by both Epic Games and Crytek at GDC '14 in San Francisco that their respective game engines (Unreal Engine 4 and CryEngine) were going to be massively overhauled and massively cheaper, making them both more accessible to the Independent development scene.

Tim Sweeney winning my heart with those Baby Blues.

Tim Sweeney winning my heart with those Baby Blues.

This was a pretty big deal to a few of us when it was announced, and we quickly set to work reviewing the changes of both UE4 and CryEngine. In the end, Epic won our hearts, mainly with tremendously beautiful introductory and tutorial videos which they clearly polished well before their GDC announcement/debut in order to have them ready for release. Probably the one major tipping point for choosing UE4 was the ability for our programmers to code in C++, as well as to use Blueprinting (which is incredibly intuitive). CryEngine lost important points in this regard but is STILL very powerful.  We chose UE4 for these reasons perhaps also because we were already a month into development on Xeno and wanted to make the transition as painless as possible

So anyway, we made the transition which took about two weeks of full-time dedication from Nicholas, Dan (our second-in-command coder to Nicholas), and myself in order to get a handle on just what it is that Unreal Engine 4 can do. And we still definitely have several months of learning ahead of us, because there's a lot that it can do.

We were lucky enough to have gotten our hands on Unity Technology's "Unity" engine over the past year, but decided to wave goodbye to it over the 1500$ price-point per developer. At least 3 of us were required to purchase it (if we chose to go Pro), and the Pro version contains all the bells and whistles that one expects to find in a moderately-high-fidelity visual experience, along with some streamlined tools to incorporate and enhance gameplay mechanics that, frankly, I was expecting to be possible right off-the-bat with Unity. They weren't, and that was disappointing.

Unreal Engine's Registry site.

Unreal Engine's Registry site.

On the flipside, Unreal Engine 4 lowered their price to 20$/month per developer (if you pay the initial 20$ and then cancel your subscription, you still get to use the software), and 5% of earned revenue generated by any finished product that you sell when you're finished. Granted, this could very well be tens of thousands of dollars more than we would have given to Unity Tech. by simply purchasing their product outright, but that's the big problem with the communication/reality between big business and Independent developers, now isn't it? Epic may be big business, but they know exactly how to speak to their relatively "new" audience of Independent developers. They know that the vast majority of us are strapped for cash and they can make even more money (and more loyal users) by catering to our needs. This price point was the huge disappointment with Unity to many of us, and both Epic and CryTek managed to raise the bar by economically lowering it. Now if only major software IPs did the same with other good software like Maya, 3DsMax, Photoshop, ZBrush, etc., then we could actually APPRECIATE the "standard" of decent quality software which is imposed upon us.  But for now I'll keep using GIMP, Blender 2.70, and Sculptris.

About 1/3 of my workflow.  MakeHuman, Sculptris, Blender, GIMP, AutoDesk FBX Converter, Unreal Engine 4

About 1/3 of my workflow.  MakeHuman, Sculptris, Blender, GIMP, AutoDesk FBX Converter, Unreal Engine 4

Anyways, /rant off.

We chose to make the switch, and its proved remarkably positive and powerful.  But the learning curve is still a steep one, if only because we've been working within the confines of Unity for so long, and also due to the sheer breadth of Unreal Engine's capabilities.  A few problems that I initially ran into were major ones, mainly the difficulty of importing separate FBX files from Blender, resizing them, and attaching them to the same general animation and skeletal rig within UE4.  This was unnecessary in Unity, for comparison, because Unity had built-in support for Blender wherein I could merely drag-n-drop a .blend file into the content browser, and VOILA, the animation/rig/mesh was ready for splicing.  Unreal Engine has built-in support for Maya (hence the native FBX requirement).  Transporting .FBX files is a bit different from transporting .OBJ files, as far as the difference between Unity and UE4 are concerned, and so that took a few days of my time to work out all of the kinks in the process and bring myself up-to-speed, which was time wherein 0% new content was being created for Xeno.  So this was the difficulty with the initial transition.  But it's beginning to pay off quickly.

A powerful part of Unreal Engine 4, from an artist's perspective, is the intuitive and visual Materials editing.  You basically have a board of output nodes on a material that you're crafting, and you have complete control over what variables and textures, and combinations thereof, are going to influence those outputs.  Things like "roughness" and "emissive" properties, Normal maps (which can be combined and in differing degrees), and moving textures on a mesh, can all be influenced in countless ways.  This gives the artist A LOT of power, and this was the first immediate thing that I realized upon coming in from Unity.  But with this complexity of output came, of course, the learning curve.  While it is intuitive, it brings into full view my vast ignorance with many of these parameters.  I'm still getting a handle on the majority of them, but I had to spend quite a large amount of time bringing myself up-to-speed with them, and there's still such a long way to go.  It's so deep and powerful that I'm quite positive I will have only touched the surface of the Material editor's capabilities in the next year, and will have an entirely new take on texturing and visualization by the time Xeno is finished.

UE4 Content Browser on left: You can see the "Hallway 1" material selected. If you double-click this...

UE4 Content Browser on left: You can see the "Hallway 1" material selected. If you double-click this...

... it opens the Material Editor, where all the power is held. It's like looking under the hood of a car.  It's visually appealing, and has an awful lot of potential power.

... it opens the Material Editor, where all the power is held. It's like looking under the hood of a car.  It's visually appealing, and has an awful lot of potential power.

Everything in the Content Browser and Scene Outliner are fairly normal and expected, pretty straightforward and very similar to Unity 3D, while quite honestly being even more intuitive than Unity.  A really helpful part of UE4 is the "Modes" box in the top-left, which allows us to drag-n-drop very important and oft-used scene props into our level, like lights, mesh geometry, collider boxes, foliage, post-process boxes, trigger blocks, and a whole lot more.

You can see some of the above-mentioned scene props in the top/left of this pic.  We added and adjusted fog in our Xeno Drop-Room.

You can see some of the above-mentioned scene props in the top/left of this pic.  We added and adjusted fog in our Xeno Drop-Room.

Coding can be done via traditional C++ compiling (I have no idea what I'm talking about), or via visual Blueprinting in exactly the same way as Material editing is handled, with call-boxes containing functions and variables that string together logically.  It's a brilliant and welcome addition to "mainstream" independent development, and something even I can do with a little prodding and some extra time!

This is a "Blueprint" that I "coded" in UE4, that opens and closes a nearby door whenever the player enters and leaves the Trigger Box, respectively.  This was very easy to execute and, as an artist with no technical programming background, almost magical to me.

This is a "Blueprint" that I "coded" in UE4, that opens and closes a nearby door whenever the player enters and leaves the Trigger Box, respectively.  This was very easy to execute and, as an artist with no technical programming background, almost magical to me.

Particle animations are absolutely gorgeous in Unreal Engine 4, and the engine comes with a few of them right off-the-bat to both WOW you, and to help kickstart you into level ambiance.  I still have yet to really learn how they work, as I'm currently knee-deep in playing catch-up with my Xeno character development and level design.

This is a "Blueprint" folder originally set up in the Content Browser and which contains pre-fabricated particle animations.

This is a "Blueprint" folder originally set up in the Content Browser and which contains pre-fabricated particle animations.

This is a Component overview of one of the pre-fabricated Particle Effect blueprints, which is basically a roaring "campfire".  It combines several assets into one, including smoke textures, flame textures, and a looping "crackling fire" sound, and all of it is animated.  I need to learn how to accomplish things like this.  It is absolutely spectacular in real-time.

This is a Component overview of one of the pre-fabricated Particle Effect blueprints, which is basically a roaring "campfire".  It combines several assets into one, including smoke textures, flame textures, and a looping "crackling fire" sound, and all of it is animated.  I need to learn how to accomplish things like this.  It is absolutely spectacular in real-time.

The Engine also allows you to put customizable "text blocks" on assets that are displayable in real-time, and this would be especially useful for things like narrative expression or HUD elements in an FPS (which is precisely what we'd use it for).  All of this and more are very easy to implement.

Customizing/Editing a text block on a solid asset.

Customizing/Editing a text block on a solid asset.

The same text block/solid asset in real-time.

The same text block/solid asset in real-time.

As you can see in the above photos, the real-time reflections are spot-on, smooth as silk, and beautifully rendered.  My computer is not as powerful as it definitely should be (especially as a 3D graphics artist), but even with multiple programs like Blender, Sculptris, GIMP, and UE4 running simultaneously, it's amazing that the in-game test-play ability of UE4 can run as smooth as it does in-situ.  It has been well worth the 20$ subscription for us so far, and we anticipate it will only get better from here.

Well that's all I have to give this week.  Hopefully next week we can get Nicholas to fill you in a little more on his take on our transition to UE4, or even just Verus Games' process in general.  Who knows?  Or we may just post a bunch of cat pics.

Until then, thank you for skimming through with us! We hope you've enjoyed! Be sure to drop us a line on our Contact page, and follow us on Twitter for near-constant updates on our Xeno progress!

~Anthony

Improved Initiative! I go first!

SO HERE WE ARE ONCE MORE!

Sorry for the shouting, I'm just so very excited to be alive today.  And yesterday, the day before, and hopefully tomorrow.  Because we officially began development for our first FULL video game this month, and every day has been an absolute treat.

Last year was CHOCK FULL of learning experiences, and I'd like to briefly outline them here:

The Path of Verus Games

We began January 2013 with TimeGem.  Nicholas followed an XNA tutorial which was posted online, step-by-step, and I... well... I modeled things terribly and inefficiently in Blender, rendered them into 2D sprites, and slapped them into the game.  And voila.  Verus was born.  Feet-first.

What... what am I looking at...?

What... what am I looking at...?

I mean, seriously.  Look at this.  Not bad for a 6-year-old, eh?  Too bad I was 29.  It must have been the paint chips.

We screwed around with TimeGem for a few months.  Three months, if I'm not mistaken, and the above-photo is juuuust about the end product.  It was a massive achievement with a very, very steep learning curve, and it looks and plays like a handful of still-wet-but-solid-enough-to-stay-together dog turds.  I hadn't touched 3D modeling software for nearly 2 years before this, and before THAT it had been about 7 years since I'd even produced any kind of visual graphical artwork.  So I have to cut myself some slack here.  We ended up calling it quits after those three months, so we could take a few days' rest and realign our priorities with what we'd learned.

Next up was the 2-dimensional puzzle game LightMaze.  This one was easier to accomplish because it was much simpler, and surprisingly much more fun.

"Filling the void" where cells belong inside of a plant.

"Filling the void" where cells belong inside of a plant.

This project took only 1 month to accomplish, with the end result being about 10-12 increasingly difficult "levels" which also become artistically and aesthetically more complex.  It helped to get me used to navigating art software (I used, and still use, GIMP for development) as well as pacing my workflow with Nicholas's programming.  I used very, very little 3D modeling for any rendering.  Nearly everything was done in GIMP.

We moved on from LightMaze to yet another 1-month project, this time in full 3D with a first-person perspective.  One of our favorites even now, a year later, known as Calculated Risk.

Suuure you can spot the MineCraft in this pic.  But if you can spot the Diablo, THEN you'll get the cookie.

Suuure you can spot the MineCraft in this pic.  But if you can spot the Diablo, THEN you'll get the cookie.

This was our first personal "success", if I do say so myself, as it was very fun to make, visually and aurally pleasing, with tight controls.  For a couple of newbies, we were pretty pleased with ourselves and still pat each other on the back over it when we find ourselves smoking our pipes in our rocking chairs with our quilts hanging over our legs.  Calculated Risk also contained our attempt at "Edutainment," and you can see it in the photo above.  Do you see those numbers above and below the crosshair?  The numbers above it are a math calculation.  The numbers below it are three possible answers to that math problem.  Each math problem is random, and you have to select the correct answer in order to reload your weapon.  Get the problem wrong and you have 3 seconds to feel sorry for yourself while you eat fireballs from the Beholder you should have been smart enough to kill.  Idiot.

Next up: Spell Bound!  Our first and, so far, last attempt at pandering our half-baked goods to the masses!  Still available for free download on your Android device!

The Crossroads to Game Dev Hell. Be sure to collect your Scrolls and punch the guards before leaving.

The Crossroads to Game Dev Hell. Be sure to collect your Scrolls and punch the guards before leaving.

H'okay, so.  Rule number 1 in Game Development: only one person actually gives a shit how much effort your put into your game... and that person is you.  Nobody else does, and nobody else will pay you money for it if that level of effort did not ALSO craft an excellent product. With that said, Nicholas and I believed, perhaps an entire year too early, that the amount of work we put into Spell Bound was worth a 1$ download on the Google Play store.  We were sorely mistaken and were reminded of this little-known fact in reviews and private correspondence.  While we were, and still are, very elated with the amount of experiential knowledge gained from this 3-month project, we were hoping to break our chains of wage slavery far too prematurely.  We took a month off to pick up the pieces of our broken, self-entitled hearts.

And FINALLY we come to our most recent finished product which nearly rounded out the entire first year for us as fledgling game developers:  Stratewarz.

Buy four environments and get an extra Desert FREE!

Buy four environments and get an extra Desert FREE!

The quality of the graphics in Stratewarz is proportional to the amount that I absolutely hate this game.  I do believe that I have a uniquely vitriolic stance on this project, and it's a fuzzy, hazy explanation as to "why" that is.  And it's boring.  And I'll violently murder my two adorable cats if I start to think about it.  So I won't go into it.  But rest assured it has something to do with it being our first "large group" development project.  Between Spell Bound and Stratewarz we ballooned from a 2-man team, to 5 people.  There was no structural network in place to support the added talent and, well, it fell apart at the end.  The only one still holding onto his balls with one hand and finishing the project with the other, three months late and alone with mud caked on his face, was Nicholas.  With grey, hazy cataracts, and fingers bleeding from weeks of midnight coding.  God bless his little heart.

And that was the entirety of 2013, which you can choose to sift through and actually play via the "GAMES" button at the top of this page.  Again, my favorite is Calculated Risk.  And as much as I emotionally loathe Stratewarz, it is rather fun to play against a friend (you need to connect to their I.P. address for networked play).  Nicholas and myself seriously worked nearly every single day of last year on all of these projects, along with our full-time day jobs.  Even the month after Spell Bound when we weren't developing, we were reading up about the industry and technical information in our respective fields every single day.  This is just what you have to do if you want to succeed at something literally from the ground-up.  And by the looks of our current project, including the massive fundamental changes we've made to the way we handle our team and our workflow, it's paying its dividends.

A unique pre-Screenshot Saturday screen for our upcoming sci-fi Co-Op game Xeno.  Keep it secret!  Keep it safe!

A unique pre-Screenshot Saturday screen for our upcoming sci-fi Co-Op game Xeno.  Keep it secret!  Keep it safe!

I'm not going to spill any beans on our next project in this Blog, if only because Nicholas is planning a blog article specifically for it in the days to come.  But I will say that I've been waiting to make this game since about a month before we even started development on TimeGem over a year ago.  And we are finally ready.  Our team is brilliant, full of both intense ability and amazing potential, and Nicholas and myself are becoming faster, more efficient, and more adept at our respective jobs (he programs, and I... uhh... "art").  This is a great day, a great year, a great century to be alive.

I'm preeeetty much finished bothering you, but before I go I just want to give an immense shout-out to Chris Solarski at http://www.solarskistudio.com/ who fairly recently published a book called Drawing Basics and Video Game Art.  The book can be found here: http://goo.gl/BFxQBf , and is worth its weight in cans of dolphin-safe Tuna if you're even the least bit interested in how to process and produce artwork in video games (or at all, really).

Day 1, before even cracking the book.  The crap I drew on the right is pre-Solarski.

Day 1, before even cracking the book.  The crap I drew on the right is pre-Solarski.

My girlfriend was genius enough to realize that I needed a guidebook concerning artwork in video games in order to enable me to progress higher up the ladder, and this book garnered some of the best reviews on Amazon.  And now I'm passing the buck on to you, and saluting mister Solarski with this shout out.  I love you, Mr. Solarski.  Shhh.  Don't tell my girlfriend.

You mean the real world is IN THREE DIMENSIONS?! HOW COULD I HAVE NOT SEEN THIS BEFORE?!

You mean the real world is IN THREE DIMENSIONS?! HOW COULD I HAVE NOT SEEN THIS BEFORE?!

I began this book as just a curious reader, and while it can easily be read cover-to-cover on its own merit, I quickly realized that it could be followed somewhat closely as a lesson guide.  So I got off my laurels and cracked the book once a day, for an hour each day, and copied and memorized and copied some more.  This enabled me, surprisingly, to get comfortable drawing on paper and treating the pencil as an extension of myself.  NOTE:  I have absolutely zero% background in art.  My background is in the sciences.  YOU CAN DO THIS TOO.

Yeah, I drew this.  In just under 1.5 hours, with Solarski's help.  NO SWEAT.

Yeah, I drew this.  In just under 1.5 hours, with Solarski's help.  NO SWEAT.

You'll gradually improve without fully realizing you are, just like any skill upon which you focus your efforts.

You'll gradually improve without fully realizing you are, just like any skill upon which you focus your efforts.

You'll learn about every part of human anatomy in order to better understand the pieces of the whole.

You'll learn about every part of human anatomy in order to better understand the pieces of the whole.

Okay, there are a lot more (I took a photo after every finished day), but I'm going to save you the time right there.  This book is amazing and almost solely responsible for the increased quality that you are about to see in the coming months with Xeno's progress.

I'm not really sure how to end this as I'm still very excited to share all of the juicy tidbits about Xeno and our progress in only the past two weeks!  Buuut I'll hold off on that.  You should really get some rest anyway, you have a big day ahead of you!  Remember?  You were going to start focusing on better understanding yourself and working on your life's passion!

I mean that.

~A.